Is it the right choice to give babies "milk calcium"?

May 03 , 2022

Amher Delancel

Is it the right choice to give babies "milk calcium"?

Concern about the lack of calcium deficiency in children. So without further ado, remember: babies generally don't need calcium supplements under 6 months, whether breastfed or formula-fed! If the doctor diagnoses calcium deficiency, it is caused by a lack of VD.
 
Many mothers ask me what calcium supplements to recommend for infants and young children. To say that Australia's "first" health product brand is deserved in calcium supplementation and bone health, Ostelin. For example. Kids' Calcium & vitamin D3. This little dinosaur children's calcium has always been Australia's best-selling children's calcium supplement.
Ostelin Kids Calcium & Vitamin D3 Chewable Tablets
However, I was also asked before 6-12-month-old children were diagnosed with calcium deficiency. Therefore, in addition to VD, let me recommend " calcium " products. However,  Kids Calcium & Vitamin D3 can only be taken by children marked as " over 2 years old". On the other hand, Ostelin has a children's milk calcium, which is suitable for babies over 7 months old :
 
Ostelin Kids Milk Calcium & Vitamin D3 Liquid 90ml
product features:
Liquid form for better absorption;
It is a calcium supplement for children that can take 7 months 
Extracted from 100% pure natural milk ;
At the same time, it contains vitamin D3 to promote the absorption of calcium;
Free of artificial colours, artificial flavours, artificial sweeteners and preservatives.
    The most significant difficulty regarding calcium supplementation is how much you supplement and "absorb" are often two different things. Besides, Ostelin's children's milk calcium is in " liquid form ", an absolute advantage in absorption and availability.
    In addition, there are not many milk calcium products in Australia. As one of the most trusted brands in Australia, Ostelin has launched the only infant milk calcium product, which I believe can give many parents a better Choice.
    Is "milk calcium" really the first choice for infant calcium supplementation?
    Does milk calcium have many advantages over other forms of calcium supplements? I believe the mixed reviews on the Internet also make many people want to know the answer to this question. So let's take a look at this article!

    Drink milk calcium; why not drink milk directly?

    Is it the right choice to give babies "milk calcium"?
    About 70% of the calcium in milk is in casein micelles, including about 40% of colloidal calcium phosphate and about 30% of calcium combined with casein. Milk calcium is a pure natural active high milk protein calcium extracted directly from milk, a concentrate of inorganic salts.
    Since milk calcium is extracted from milk, instead of spending money to buy milk calcium, why not just drink milk directly? That's right! Milk contains calcium, usually about 100mg per 100ml of milk. However, many parents have to face when their children "don't like to drink milk" and "don't drink enough milk" supplementing the daily calcium from milk alone may not be enough.
    For example, a 1-year-old child, due to various reasons, drinks 200ml less milk than other children every day, then he can achieve the same calcium intake by supplementing 2ml of Ostelin milk calcium.
    Therefore, "you don't need to buy milk calcium, just drink milk"... This sentence, I really can't say so absolutely.
     
    Is calcium in milk better 'absorbed'?
    When it comes to calcium supplement products, we often struggle with "what calcium" is contained. For example, we may have seen a lot of articles on the Internet saying that the body more readily absorbs milk calcium (or calcium in milk).
     
    Let's take a look at the following scientific Study:
    Is it the right choice to give babies "milk calcium"?
     
    In this trial, 8 subjects received 500 mg of calcium from 5 different water-soluble calcium salts and milk per day. The final result of calcium absorption was not statistically significant (the difference was minimal ). In contrast, Calcium absorption in whole milk is similar to that of other calcium infusions (calcium carbonate, calcium acetate, calcium lactate, calcium gluconate, calcium citrate).
     
    In other words, milk calcium is better absorbed? ---it's not true.
     
    So why are there so many calcium supplements for babies?
    Or choose the form of "milk calcium"?
    Is it just a "gimmick"?
    。。。。。。
     
     
    To figure out the answer to this question, we should first understand a concept:
    ↓↓↓

    Calcium absorption is not equal to calcium "utilization."

     
    Is it the right choice to give babies "milk calcium"?

    Distribution of calcium in the human body:

     
    Bones, Teeth: 99%(Hydroxyapatite);
    Bound calcium (citrate or protein): 0.5% ;
    Miscible calcium stores (soft tissue, extracellular fluid, blood ): 0.5% 
     
    Calcium enters the blood from the intestine to form "blood calcium" and exists in soft tissue, extracellular fluid and blood in a free or bound ionic state, which is collectively referred to as a "miscible calcium pool". The miscible calcium pool and the calcium in the bone maintain a " dynamic balance ", that is, the calcium in the bone is continuously released from the osteoclasts into the miscible calcium pool, and the calcium in the miscible calcium pool is continuously in the form of "bone salt". Deposited in osteoblasts to become "bone calcium".
     
    We usually call calcium "absorption" that calcium enters the " blood ". Although blood calcium concentration plays a vital role in the human body and can regulate our neuromuscular system and cardiovascular system, the ultimate purpose of most people's calcium supplementation is to promote the growth and development of " bone " and " teeth " Or to maintain their health, aka "utilization" of calcium.

     

    The advantage of milk calcium lies in its high " availability "!

    Is it the right choice to give babies "milk calcium"?
     
    First, the primary form of milk calcium, "Hydroxyapatite" (HAP), is the main form of calcium that composes our bones and teeth. It is the main inorganic component of human and animal bones and can achieve chemical bonds with body tissues at the interface. Combined, it promotes the repair of defective tissue and shows biological activity.
     
    Let's take a look at the scientific literature:
    ↓↓↓
    The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended as health or medical advice. Vitamin and mineral supplements should not replace a balanced diet. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives. 
     
     Sixty postmenopausal women participated in an open-label study with subjects divided into three groups. One group continued to take the collagen hydroxyapatite compound. Bone mineral density ( BMD ) assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry was measured before and at 12 and 24 months of treatment. RESULTS: The hydroxyapatite-only subjects showed no significant changes related to baseline bone mass throughout the study, with reductions occurring in both the first and second BMD measurements in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Continued use of hydroxyapatite compounds may prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women.
     
    That is to say, hydroxyapatite, the primary form of milk calcium, is more easily utilized by the body's bones after entering the bloodstream than other forms of calcium supplementation products. This reminds me of the famous article on the Internet, " Eating bone broth can't supplement calcium". This is because it unilaterally emphasizes the "absorption" of calcium but completely ignores the "utilization" of calcium, which is unscientific.
    Is it the right choice to give babies "milk calcium"?
     
     
    Secondly, another prominent feature of milk calcium products that is different from other calcium supplement products is that milk calcium products are generally " complex products ". Milk calcium is extracted from milk, which determines that milk calcium also contains some "by-products" that other calcium supplement products do not have, such as casein phosphopeptide ( CPP ) is one of them. Such by-products effectively enhance calcium utilization and stabilize the "calcium ions" in bone and teeth.
     
     Let's take a look at the scientific literature:
    Is it the right choice to give babies "milk calcium"?
     
     
    Casein phosphopeptide ( CPP ) stabilizes calcium phosphate by forming a casein - phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate complex ( CPP-CP ). When a solution of CPP-CP was administered to the molars of animals twice daily, the synthetic octapeptide - calcium phosphate complex significantly reduced caries activity, mainly because the CPP-CP complex significantly increased calcium phosphate levels in the teeth.
    Is it the right choice to give babies "milk calcium"?
     
    That is, calcium, even when absorbed, enters the bloodstream and is eventually used by bones and teeth. But how long can they "stay" in our bones and teeth?.  From this point of view, milk calcium, a "complex product" containing casein phosphopeptides, may indeed help calcium to exist more "firmly" in our bones and teeth.
     
    After reading the above, I believe that you also have a deeper understanding of "milk calcium". I can't say that milk calcium is necessarily the best calcium supplement, but, in comparison, it is extracted from natural milk and may be more suitable for infants and young children than chemically synthesized products; on the other hand, milk calcium Although there is no advantage of absorption, it is better than the excellent "availability", and infants and young children are the crucial periods for the development of bones and teeth. The calcium "into the bone" and "into the teeth" is undoubtedly more important than the "into the blood". Much more critical.
     
    Of course, milk calcium is not suitable for all children. Because it contains milk by-products and lactose, please also pay attention: infants with lactose intolerance and milk allergy are not recommended to take calcium supplements from milk calcium products.
    Is it the right choice to give babies "milk calcium"? 
    The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended as health or medical advice. Vitamin and mineral supplements should not replace a balanced diet. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives.